Georgia Regents University Summerville and Health Sciences Campuses (specifically the libraries and JSAC) will resume regular weekend operating hours on Sunday, Feb. 16 in preparation for normal student activities and classes on Monday, Feb. 17.

The Urban Bush Women performance scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 15 at 7:30 PM at the GRU Augusta Maxwell Theatre on the Summerville Campus, will take place as scheduled.

The Jaguars’ Peach Belt Conference basketball doubleheader with Columbus State (originally scheduled for Thursday) will take place on Sunday, Feb. 16 at 2:00 and 4:00 p.m. in Christenberry Fieldhouse on the Forest Hills Campus.

Visit news.gru.edu/alert for the latest information.

Neonatology 2013

Kiawah Island

35th Annual
Neonatology: The Sick Newborn
Including STABLE, PICC Line and
Pediatric Neonatal Vascular Ultrasound Courses

September 20-22, 2013
Kiawah Island, South Carolina

Presented by
Medical College of Georgia at
Georgia Regents University
and Division of Continuing Education

 



PURPOSE
This conference will update neonatal health care professionals on basic and complex neonatal issues. Workshops on PICC lines, STABLE, and Pediatric Neonatal Vascular Ultrasound are featured. The conference will benefit both the health care professional new to neonatal-perinatal medicine and the experienced practitioner.


OBJECTIVES
This conference should enable participants to:
-Set improved goals for preterm infant growth using newer comparable-age fetus based growth charts
-Categorize neonatal heart disease, recognize urgent heart lesions, and respond early to reduce morbidity and mortality
-Promote optimal outcomes (and avoid adverse outcomes) by implementing early and aggressive feeding strategies
-Be an advocate for human milk by knowing when to use donor milk and when and how to fortify human milk
-Recognize and prepare patients with surgical emergencies for surgery or for transport
-Improve perinatal communication for better delivery outcomes
-Make informed decisions based on the current practices of ethics and limits of viability
-Extrapolate from the 6th Ed. NRP guidelines to improve long-term outcomes starting in the first minutes of life
-Provide optimal and efficient care to our smallest patients while reducing costs
-Address the question of “Just because we can, should we?” through 2 case presentations


CREDIT
The general session of this activity includes a maximum of 11.50 hours of instruction and is approved by the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University for 11.50 continuing education credit hours.

For nurses: The Georgia Regents University Division of Continuing Education is an approved provider of continuing nursing education by the Georgia Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.
11.50 Contact hours.

Accreditation: The Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation: The Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University designates this live activity for a maximum of 11.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Application for CME credit has been filed with the American Academy of Family Physicians. Determination of credit is pending.

Note: Optional PICC I and II workshop includes 8 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits and 8 contact hours. Optional STABLE workshop includes 8 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits and 8 contact hours. Optional Pediatric Neonatal Vascular Ultrasound Workshop includes 2 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits and 2 contact hours.

 

THURSDAY, September 19

 

3-5:00

Early Registration, East Beach Conference Center

 

FRIDAY, September 21

 

7:00

Registration and Continental Breakfast

 

7:30

Welcome and Introduction to Course - Dr. Jatinder Bhatia

 

8:00

Growth Goal for the Preterm Infant - Dr. Tanis Fenton
The fetus grows at an astounding rate to achieve a birthweight of 7 to 8 pounds (about 3,500 grams) by term. Key guideline groups, including the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that preterm infant growth mimics the growth of the fetus. Thus, we need to look at intrauterine growth assessments to develop growth goals for infants born prematurely. Perhaps the best available source of intrauterine growth data is from recent data from developed countries, with gestational age assessments or corrections for inaccurate gestational age estimates. The PreM Growth study (Preterm Multicentre Growth study) provides a comparison of recent preterm infant growth for comparison with fetal growth estimates.

 

8:45

Cardiac Emergencies - Dr. William Lutin
Congenital heart disease presents in benign and aggressive forms. Recognizing serious lesions as soon as they start presenting could aid in minimizing morbidity and mortality.

 

9:30

Panel for Questions

 

10:00

Break

 

10:15

Nutrition in the Premature Infant: Why and How
- Dr. Jatinder Bhatia
The increasing survival of premature infants and the global burden of prematurity and low birth weight makes this cohort of infants an important public health concern. These infants are at high risk for extra uterine growth restriction, infections, developmental delay, chronic lung disease, and mortality. Among premature infants, it is well recognized that early aggressive parenteral nutrition and early initiation of enteral nutrition can minimize the time to return to birth weight and potentially reduce the burden of growth restriction. Utilizing appropriate feeding strategies and promoting the best growth possible has demonstrated multiple benefits: infants growing at the highest quartiles demonstrate less neurocognitive adverse effects and incidence of chronic lung disease than infants growing at the lower quartiles. In this presentation, rationale for early nutrition, strategies of parenteral and enteral nutrition both for in hospital and post hospital will be emphasized.

 

11:00

Breast is Best: Using Human Milk to Improve Outcomes
- Amy Gates
It has long been acknowledged that human milk is the best feeding for all infants. Human milk offers a unique protection for the premature infant. Human milk has been shown to improve outcomes such as length of stay, days on parenteral nutrition, and infection rates. Despite this understanding, there are challenges to feeding human milk in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit [NICU]. The long separation of mother and baby negatively effects mother's milk supply, creating a need for supplementation with infant formula or donor human milk. Fortification of human milk is necessary to ensure adequate levels of nutrients to promote growth. Amy Gates will outline the benefits of human milk, the appropriate use for donor milk, and how to adequately and safely fortify human milk.

 

11:45

Panel for Questions

 

Noon

Adjourn

 

Afternoon Session (1-5pm) - Simultaneous Workshops

(Lunch provided to workshop participants)

 

1:00

STABLE - Johnny Wilson
S.T.A.B.L.E. is the most widely distributed and implemented neonatal education program to focus exclusively on the post-resuscitation/pre-transport stabilization care of sick infants. Based on a mnemonic to optimize learning, retention and recall of information, S.T.A.B.L.E. stands for the six assessments and care modules in the program: Sugar, Temperature, Airway, Blood pressure, Lab work, and Emotional support. A seventh module, Quality Improvement, stresses the professional responsibility of improving and evaluating care provided to sick infants.

 

1:00

PICC Line Course - Debbie Wall
This two-day program is designed to fulfill the didactic and practicum components of instruction for insertion, use, and care of PICC catheters. The didactic portion of this program will include many topics of discussion including the insertion procedure and care and maintenance. Following the didactic portion of the class, each workshop participant will be required to demonstrate a PICC insertion in the classroom setting. They will receive a certificate of program participation and 8 continuing education credits. The course instructors will be available for supervision and support during the practicum portion of the class.

 

SATURDAY, September 21

 

7:00

Registration and Continental Breakfast

 

7:45

Welcome and Introductions - Amy Gates

 

8:00

Neonatal Surgical Emergencies - Dr. Walter Pipkin
Almost all surgical lesions that call upon the medical team for urgent attention are diagnosed prior to birth. In this session, commonly presenting lesions that are surgical emergencies and immediate steps that need to be taken prior to either transport or surgical consultation will be outlined.

 

8:45

Art Hardy Memorial Lecture
NIPPV: It's Day has Come - Dr. Kris Sekar
An infant who is not intubated usually does not develop chronic lung disease! As more evidence becomes available, early recognition of RDS and treatment with surfactant or CPAP and the use of NIPPV will be highlighted in this lecture.

 

9:30

Panel for Questions

 

10:00

Break

 

10:15

Optimizing Neonatal Care before Delivery - Dr. Paul Browne
As prenatal diagnosis and OB care has advanced, there is a wealth of information about fetal health which translates to neonatal care. Prenatal diagnosis is not only about detecting birth defects. Technology exists to assess failure to thrive (IUGR), fetal obesity (macrosomia), fetal health (BPP), placental health (Doppler velocity studies), fetal anemia (MCA Dopplers), twin discordance, etc. Accurate prenatal diagnosis and appropriate communication to neonatal providers optimizes the transition from fetal life to neonatal life. This lecture will discuss technology and perinatal communication strategies to improve neonatal outcomes.

 

11:00

Limits of Viability - Dr. Linda Sacks
The current consensus is that infants born prior to 23 weeks gestation are considered non-viable. However, the best estimate of gestational age is the obstetrician's estimate of gestational age. Further, neonatologists can estimate gestational age to within two weeks, but whether an infant is viable or not cannot be determined just based on visualization except in extreme cases. Limits of viability and problems with survival are the focus of this discussion.

 

11:45

Panel for Questions

 

Noon

Adjourn

 

Afternoon Session (1-5pm) - Simultaneous Workshops

(Lunch provided for workshop participants)

 

1:00

STABLE , Part Two

 

1:00

PICC Line Course, Part Two

 

6:00

Reception at Mingo Point

 

7:00

Dinner at Mingo Point

 

SUNDAY, September 22

 

7:00

Continental Breakfast

 

7:45

Welcome and Introduction - Amy Gates

 

8:00

The First Hour - Dr. Triven Bashambu
Delivery room personnel during the first moments of life have an opportunity to impact not only the immediate success of the newborn, but also long-term outcomes such as developmental delay and even death. Efficient team management, minimizing oxygen exposure, and optimizing lung recruitment are just some of the challenges faced during this transitional period. The focus of this presentation will be to discuss these challenges and the latest evidence-based recommendations for delivery room management of the newborn.

 

8:45

The NRP and Beyond: Do's and Don'ts - Dr. Anjali Parish
With the ever-changing landscape in neonatology, this lecture will focus on the best evidence available about monitoring limits, use of therapies including oxygen.

 

9:30

Panel for Questions

 

10:00

Break and Check Out

 

10:45

Debbie Matthei Memorial Lecture
What Do We Know? Twenty Years of Trials in Neonatology -
 Dr. John Zupancic
In this era of constricting resources, we are all called upon to provide health care more efficiently, at a lower cost, and with better outcomes. This discussion will focus on various issues in this area.

 

11:30

Case Presentations and Questions in the New Era of Health Care - Dr. Jatinder Bhatia
In the uncertain times ahead of us, there will be new questions raised about treatment modalities that may be humanely justified, but not evidence-informed. In other parts of the world, such restrictions on treatment are applied, and withdrawal of care is also performed if the parents/family do not have an ability to pay.
In these case presentations, we will review two cases where infants were placed on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Questions that we will explore together are: 1. Were the decisions ethically sound? 2. Did the cost justify the means? 3. Did we do the right thing?

 

12:15

Panel for Questions

 

12:30

Adjourn

 

Afternoon Session (12:30-2:30 pm) - Workshop

(Lunch provided for workshop participants)

 

 

Pediatric Neonatal Vascular Ultrasound Course - Debbie Wall, Marcus Dye, Teresa Dye, and Debbie Elder
This is a step-by-step Ultrasound Guided PICC Insertion Training program that introduces the clinician to the use of ultrasound for vessel identification, visualization, and as an aid in needle access during PICC placement. Steps for and use of modified seldinger technique for the neonatal and pediatric population will be included. It is recommended that the applicant already be PICC trained or be registered in the PICC class provided at this conference.

 

2:30

Adjourn

 

 

MINGO POINT
Low Country Oyster Roast

 

Join us Saturday night for an authentic Low Country Oyster Roast reception with specialty beverage.
Dinner includes a whole pit roasted pig, Carolina Pork Spareribs, and all of the Southern side dishes you would expect.
Network with other neonatal professionals as you enjoy music and the beautiful waterfront scenery of Mingo Point.
Tickets are $25 per adult and $15 for children 5-12, under 5 free.
Tickets include two bar tickets for wine, beer, or soft drinks.
Pre-registration Required

 

 

GUEST FACULTY

Debbie Elder, R.N., B.S.N., C.R.N.I., V.A.-B.C.
Debbie Elder has been with Bard Access System since 2006 as the Clinical Nurse Educator for all Vascular Access Devices. Prior to Bard, Debbie was with Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta, GA as a staff nurse in medical surgery and IV therapy.

Tanis Fenton, Ph.D. R.D.
Dr. Tanis Fenton is a Dietitian and an Epidemiologist, with 18 years of clinical experience in neonatal intensive care. Dr. Fenton is best known for her work on developing growth charts for preterm infants.
Currently an adjunct assistant professor at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Tanis is an invited member of the Canadian Expert Panel for Canadian Nutrient Requirements and Feeding of the Preterm Infant, and was selected by Dietitians of Canada to be Liaison to the Canadian Pediatric Society Nutrition Committee. Tanis was recently invited to be a member of the Oxford-based INTERGROWTH team to develop a growth standard for preterm infants. Tanis' main research areas include critical appraisal in nutrition, neonatal nutrition and growth. Tanis recently revised the Fenton Preterm Growth chart, which is being widely used worldwide. This growth chart has been recommended in 16 textbooks.


Anjali Parish, M.D.
Dr. Anjali Parish joined the Family Ties Birthing Center staff at Coliseum Health System and the Medical Center of Central Georgia in Macon, Georgia, in the fall of 2010. She specializes in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine. Board certified, Dr. Parish has over 15 years of pediatric experience. Dr. Parrish received her Doctor of Medicine from the University of Mississippi before training at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta.


Linda Sacks, M.D.
Dr. Linda Mann Sacks, a native of Philadelphia, is a magna cum laude graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, College for Women. She received her medical degree from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University in New York City in 1973. Dr. Sacks took five years to complete her degree, taking a year off between third and fourth year studies to give birth to her first child, the first female student at P&S to ever do so outrageous a deed. There were twelve women in her 120 member graduating class. After internship and residency in Pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, she completed a two year fellowship in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
Dr. Sacks is Board Certified in Pediatrics and Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine. Following a (thankfully) short career in academic medicine at the University of Pennsylvania where she specialized in measuring calcium uptake from brain and heart mitochondria harvested from oxygen deprived lambs and rats, she moved to Savannah, Georgia where she has practiced clinical neonatology since 1983. Dr. Sacks is Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics on the faculty at Mercer University School of Medicine and the Medical College of Georgia. She is currently the Medical Director of a seven physician, six nurse practitioner group and oversees a neonatal intensive care unit that admits 800 medical and surgical patients a year.


Kris Sekar, M.D.
Dr. Sekar, Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, completed a pediatric residency and neonatology fellowship at the Georgetown University Medical Center. He is the Medical Director of the Oklahoma University Children's Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Pediatric Sleep Laboratory. He studies pulmonary physiology and infant breathing and has participated in National Institutes of Health studies involving nitric oxide, surfactants and noninvasive ventilation. He has contributed to over 80 peer-reviewed papers in journals including Pediatrics, the Journal of Perinatology, the American Journal of Perinatology, Pediatric Pulmonology, and Biology of the Neonate.


John Zupancic, M.D.
Dr. Zupancic received his Bachelor of Science degree from Victoria College at the University of Toronto, where he was awarded the
G. A. Cox Gold Medal in Life Sciences upon graduation. He undertook his undergraduate medical training and pediatrics residency at McMaster University and completed his fellowship in neonatal-perinatal medicine in the Joint Program in Neonatology at Harvard Medical School. Concurrent with his neonatology fellowship training, he was awarded a Doctorate in Health Policy, with concentrations in Decision Science and Economics, from the Harvard School of Public Health. He is currently Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Harvard Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship Program.
Alongside his research contributions,
Dr. Zupancic has a strong commitment to methodological and clinical teaching, research mentoring, and career development. As Director of one of the largest neonatology fellowship programs in the United States, he has primary responsibility for the clinical and scholarly education of trainees as they rotate through the four main Harvard teaching hospitals, numerous research laboratories, and ancillary research fellowships. He has regularly mentored fellows in health services research projects and is the recipient of both the Merton R. Bernfield Mentoring Award from the Fellows of the Harvard Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship Program and the national John M. Eisenberg Excellence in Mentorship Award from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

 

CO-COURSE DIRECTORS


Jatinder Bhatia, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of Neonatology

Amy Gates, R.D., C.S.P., L.D., Board Certified Pediatric Nutrition Specialist

 

GRU FACULTY


Triven Bashambu, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics


Paul C. Browne, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chief, Maternal Fetal Medicine


Marcus Dye, R.N., Pediatric Vascular Access Team, Children's Hospital of Georgia


Teresa Dye, R.N., Pediatric Vascular Access Team, Children's Hospital of Georgia


Pat King, Program Coordinator


William A. Lutin, M.D., Ph.D.
, Professor of Pediatrics

 

Jason Parker, M.D., Fellow, Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine


Walter L. Pipkin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery


Deborah A. Wall, R.N.C.-N.I.C., C-N.P.T., Neonatal Nurse Clinician; Neonatal ECMO/Transport; PICC Trainer


Johnny Wilson, R.N., Neonatal Specialist/Outreach Educator


Leann VanLandingham, R.N., M.S.N., Clinical Nurse Educator, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Children's Hospital of Georgia

 

Course Registration Fees
$350 Entire Conference (Physicians) $200 per day (Physicians)
$235 All Others (nursing, residents and fellows) $100 per day

Optional PICC I and II Workshop (Limited number of participants / Lunch Included)

$100 If registered for entire conference $125 PICC Only
Optional STABLE certification/recertification (Limited number of participants / Lunch Included)
$100 If registered for entire conference $125 STABLE Only
Optional Pediatric Neonatal Vascular Ultrasound (Limited number of participants / Lunch Included)
$100 If registered for entire conference $125 PNVU Course only

 

 

                                         

 

Print the
REGISTRATION FORM

and mail it
with payment to:
Division of Continuing Education
Georgia Regents University
919 15th Street
Augusta, Georgia 30912

Fax
REGISTRATION FORM
with payment by credit card
to 706-721-4642.

Call the Division of Continuing Education at

706-721-3967 or
1- 800-221-6437

 

KIAWAH ISLAND RESORT

Located on the Atlantic Ocean only 21 miles from historic Charleston, Kiawah Island has been developed into one of America's finest resorts while preserving the environmental richness of its barrier island setting. Kiawah's natural beauty and bountiful wildlife have been carefully preserved amid golf courses referred to as the “Pebble Beach of the East Coast” and a tennis program ranked among the top 10 in the United States. Ten miles of broad, sparkling beach ranked the Second Most Romantic Beach in America invite you to explore all the opportunities that Kiawah offers for recreation, education and renewal.
During free time, you and your family can enjoy the unspoiled beach, large, cool swimming pools, and the spa with therapeutic massage, saunas, and hot tubs. Golfers will enjoy the challenge of Kiawah's five championship golf courses. Imagine the thrill of testing your skills on the course that hosted the 1991 Ryder Cup, 2007 Senior PGA, 2012 PGA Championship or walking the course that was the setting for the movie, Bagger Vance. Avid tennis players can easily find a game or a lesson at the two nationally known tennis centers. Parents and kids appreciate well-organized children's and teen recreation programs, and evening children's activities enable parents to enjoy a quiet evening together at one of the resort's restaurants. In addition, the shops and culture of the historical city of Charleston are nearby for you and your family to explore and enjoy.

HOTEL RESERVATIONS
For reservations, contact the Reservations Department, Kiawah Island Resort, 1 Sanctuary Drive, Kiawah Island, SC 29455. If calling 800-654-2924, identify your group as Georgia Regents University and/or group booking number 10000. You may fax reservations to 843-768-2736. Deadline for reservations is August 18, 2013. Reservations received after this date will be filled on a space-and-rate available basis. Check-in time is 4 p.m. with checkout time at 10:30 a.m. Room rates (scenic view villa): $179 one bedroom, $219 two bedrooms.

 


 

SPECIAL NEEDS
The Georgia Regents University Division of Continuing Education complies with the Americans With Disabilities Act. If you require special services, facilities or dietary considerations (vegetarian or otherwise) to support your participation in this continuing education program, contact the conference coordinator at 800-221-6437 or 706-721-3967

 

COMFORT ZONE
Although every effort will be made to have a comfortable temperature in the meeting room, we realize that everyone's comfort zone is different. Please bring a jacket or sweater in case the room is too cool for your comfort.

 

 

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Transparent Panel for Emergency Use